Top 10 Sport and Specialty “On The Road” Cars in 2018 – It’s Been a Great Year

Top 10 Sport and Specialty “On The Road” Cars in 2018 – It’s Been a Great Year

 

It’s that time of year to reflect on our accomplishments in 2018, and it was a great year for us at Sport and Specialty. We worked, we played, we raced, and we even hired a new operations manager for the shop! Things are already looking great for 2019, too.

Looking back over 2018 we’re proud to see the cars that gained “On The Road” status in 2018. They included Austin-Healeys, Jaguars, Alfa Romeos, and even a small armored car…seriously. We made sure that every project got that special attention that their owners count on from us. We’re serious when we say that we preserve the art and soul of vintage sports cars. 

Take a look through our Top 10 “On The Road” cars list below. Just like our children, we really don’t play favorites, they’re all special to us in their own way. Also, make sure to check out our full list of On The Road cars, it’s one of our most popular pages on the website. 

Happy New Year, everyone!


 

#10 – 1965 Austin Healey 3000 BJ8

This car is another re-commission project, having sat for a few years. Some engine work, body work, and a fresh new top and set of tires has this one back on the road being enjoyed by its owner.

 

 

#9 –1966 Austin Healey 3000

With some extensive front end damage, this beauty got refreshed from head-to-toe. We repaired the collision damage and then freshened the paint, interior, and mechanical components to get this one back to the car shows. Make sure to check out the smiles on the owner’s faces as they show it off to their friends.

#8 – 1948 Triumph 2000 Roadster

This unique car came in not running and with overheating issues. Newly acquired by a Healey customer, we set about making it safe and reliable. First, we got all of the gauges working and made sure the doors opened and closed with regularity and then tackled the various mechanical issues. Read on to learn more about this project.

#7 – 1971 Alfa Romeo Kamm Tail Spider

This is a first year Kamm Tail 1750 Spider with only 4,829 produced. We had been working to slowly refurbish the car that would include a full engine rebuild in 2017 when I couldn’t help myself and bought the car for my personal use. You can see and read more on the website. 

#6 –1965 Alfa Romeo Duetto Spider

This car belonged to our friend and Ferrari aficionado Tom Caulfield. We have been servicing the car for years, including an engine overhaul. The current owner, and another regular customer, recently brought it in for a few minor issues and a new exhaust. We also did a service check on this very original and really nice Duetto and got him back on the road. 

#5 – 1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint

This car had been sitting for a quite a few years and been started but not used on the road for a while. It’s a really nice and well-loved car that had an older restoration but needed some service and refreshing.

#4 – Ferret Armored Car

We worked on a Land Rover last year for a customer who has some interesting vehicles. He recently acquired this Ferret Armored Scout Car that he hasn’t been able to get started and asked if we would like a go at it. After a fair amount of troubleshooting we got the six cylinder Rolls Royce gasoline engine to pop, but not run consistently. It was fun to have here for a while, but we don’t see a new niche opening up soon.

#3 – 1969 Alfa Romeo GTV Race Car

It seems that race cars are never really done and are basically new every two or three years. In 2017 I had an issue on the dyno and had to rebuild in a hurry. I got back to the dyno in June of 2018 where I finally got it dialed in, with great torque numbers and good peak horsepower coming in at 7200 RPM. A fresh clutch, gearbox rebuild, some fresh paint on the nose, and some early prep will pay dividends in 2019. Ready to go!!

#2 –1969 Jaguar Series 2 E-Type

This survivor car had been stored in a clean dry environment since the mid 1970s. We brought it back mechanically, got it running, and rebuilt the suspension and drivetrain. Now, with all new glass, trim, and a fresh paint job, the owner is all smiles and back on the road.

#1 – 1965 Ferrari 330GT 2+2

Enzo Ferrari himself declared the Series 1 330 GT 2+2 as his favorite and regular driver. This beautiful Ferrari is a complete nut-and bolt-restoration – and more. An unfortunate accident almost finished this car. It was rear ended and pushed into a telephone pole and ended up looking like a silver fortune cookie, with very few usable body components left. To read the rest of the story of this build, check it out in our Concours Showcase


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The 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave

A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event, organized this time by the Texas Austin Healey Clubs. A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event,...

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The Ferrari 330GT 2+2 home today! One of our finest total builds.

The Ferrari 330GT 2+2 home today! One of our finest total builds.

Must be our week to send home some beauties! Our customer drove his Ferrari 330GT 2+2 home today! One of our finest total builds. Took home his parts car too. Glade loved the test drives. To see the history of this beauty, make sure to see it in our Concours Showcase.


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The 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave

A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event, organized this time by the Texas Austin Healey Clubs. A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event,...

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The 2018 Sport and Specialty Drive Out – Cool cars, nice people, fun projects!

The 2018 Sport and Specialty Drive Out – Cool cars, nice people, fun projects!

Thanks to all who attended our first ever “Drive Out.” The impromptu car show was a great success and the weather couldn’t have been better. This will be an annual event I think. I need to thank the Sport and Specialty crew, Ryan, Bill, Max Lindsay, Glade, and Cameron, along with our great customers and friends for making today so much fun.

As always, make sure to keep checking our Facebook and Instagram pages for more pictures – so many people taking so many pictures!


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The 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave

A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event, organized this time by the Texas Austin Healey Clubs. A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event,...

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Love to see these kind of smiles!!!

Love to see these kind of smiles!!!

We delivered this beautiful BJ8 Healey to David and Ellen with a mini mechanical restoration. Full engine and all accessories rebuild with a new wiring harness. Good for many more thousands of miles of fun!


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The 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave

A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event, organized this time by the Texas Austin Healey Clubs. A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event,...

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When you drop off your Healey and your other car isn’t a car

When you drop off your Healey and your other car isn’t a car


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The 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave

A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event, organized this time by the Texas Austin Healey Clubs. A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event,...

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Guest Blog: Peter Conover’s Road to Restorations

Guest Blog: Peter Conover’s Road to Restorations

Peter Conover and his Aston Martin DB MkIIII first became interested in the restoration British cars about 20 years ago when an acquaintance agreed to sell me his long-dormant Triumph TR-6. For that learning experience I did a basic mechanical and cosmetic restoration. It wasn’t a “ground up” restoration, but I learned what was involved. For my subsequent restoration, an Austin Healey 3000, I did do a complete restoration. It was the first time that I ever purchased a car and worked on it for years before I ever had the chance to drive it. It was during the Healey restoration that I met Mark Baker at Sport & Specialty in Durand, IL. Mark and I developed a professional/friendship relationship wherein he allowed me to do as much work on the project as I was able. This not only saved me some labor costs, but more importantly, contributed to my connection with the car.

Before my Healey project was complete, I was already looking for my next project. An exhibit of James Bond cars at the National Motor Museum in Beaulieu introduced the notion of an Aston Martin. Research revealed that the prices of these cars were in a whole different league than what I had experienced so far, but confident of my ability to restore an affordable rough example, I set about trying to locate a suitable candidate. In October 2005 I tried to acquire a DB MkIII drophead that was up for auction in the U.K., but was quickly outbid past my limit. However, later that fall, 3 different coupes amazingly came available within a few weeks. The first was in California, the second in Italy, and a third one in Ohio.

As the one in Ohio was most promising, as well as most accessible from Chicago, I went to see it and bought it on the spot. The car had been originally dispatched in January 1958 to a dealership in Los Angeles and evidently spent most of its early years in California. It had been last titled in California in 1992 to an individual residing in Newport Beach. Apparently, sometime after an accident, repair/restoration work was begun, but before the job was completed, the car was sold to someone in Ohio. That buyer held onto the car for over 12 years, without doing any further work on the car, until he decided to sell it in 2005. Although I was able to contact the Ohio owner, I was unsuccessful in my attempt to reach the former owner in California.

After bringing the car to Illinois, I soon realized how much of it was missing. Although I had known that it had no interior (the seats were missing completely) and it had been hit in the rear, it was only through further research that I found out just how much was not there – nothing that couldn’t be replaced, but as there isn’t too much documentation, it would be difficult for me to know exactly how these cars were put together. The more I got into it, the more I felt I needed something to model the pieces on.

Feeling a bit of buyer’s remorse and thinking I might have been better off with one of the other cars, it was suggested to me by Kevin Kay, the Feltham Aston restoration specialist who had been advising me, that I get the California car that I had been considering earlier in addition to the one I already had. After the initial shock of this idea wore off, what he had to say made sense: “First, you could use an unmolested example to build your car by. Second, the MkIII is a rare and sought-after car, and you could sell it when you were done for good money.” As it was still available, we snatched it up. As it turned out, the two cars were very similar: In addition to both being early MkIIIs (with the small taillights), according to the factory build sheets they were both originally Black cars with Red interiors. The big difference was that one now had no interior but intact mechanicals, while the other had a complete (albeit shoddy) interior and the mechanicals apart.

Mark Baker thought it was a great idea. He felt having two cars next to each other would answer a lot of questions that would arise during restoration. The two cars were brought together at Mark’s shop in April 2006: AM300/3/1380 completely dismantled, with body work proceeding, while AM300/3/1391 stood proudly to the side. Many people asked me if I was going to make one car out of the two. Not only did I feel that would be a disservice to this rare model, but I was counting on the proceeds from the sale of the second car to offset some of my expenses on the first. As it turned out, I was made an “offer I couldn’t refuse” on the second car, and sold it before I was completely finished with it.

As the years stretched on, I was dumbfounded on how long the restoration was taking and how expensive it was turning out to be. But having thrown myself 100% into the endeavor, I was determined to see it through. Finally, in July 2011, I brought it home in time to drive it to Elkhart Lake where it made its debut at the Road and Track Concours.


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The 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave

A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event, organized this time by the Texas Austin Healey Clubs. A quick wrap up from my trip to the 2017 Austin-Healey Conclave - in short: another great event,...

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